How To Pick The Right Dog Shock Collar For Your Dog

There are many reasons why people will purchase a dog shock collar. Most people just want to control their dog’s barking, running off or some other kind of unwanted behavior. Others may have specially trained dogs and they need to know where they are, especially if the person is handicapped.

Dog shock collars
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The following are descriptions of the different kinds of a dog shock collar you can purchase:

E-Collars

These are electrical collars. Many of the more inexpensive ones come with just one function that cannot be adjusted. Barking signals the collar to shock the dog. The collar then should just gently shock the dog to let the dog know his barking is wrong. Many times these devices can damage a dog’s skin, even leading to an infection.

Good advancements in these collars have been made over the years and you can now purchase ones with a remote control that have beeps, vibrations and shocks to control your dog from unwanted barking and behavior. These devices do not hurt the dog, but allow the dog to know the trainer or owner is communicating with him and that the dog needs to pay attention. Professional dog trainers, especially dog whisperers, only use the beeps and vibration. The dog learns to pay attention to the trainer or owner and when they do, they get a reward.

 Remote Dog Shock Collar

This collar has been designed by professional dog trainers. These kind of collars are not recommended for puppies under six months old, but it is a good idea to get them used to wearing the collar before the training starts. They come with two sets of metal contacts for both short and long haired dogs. This system comes complete with a training package and instructions on how to use the collar. Many of them come with as many as one hundred settings and some even have GPS and mapping capabilities, in order for you to locate your dog.

 Is A Dog Shock Collar Harmful To Your Dog?

This question is debatable among professional dog trainers. Interestingly, a study was conducted using German Shepherds and a Rottweiler, which were being trained as police dogs. They were put into two groups: those who received shocks and the other received some other type of correction. The dogs that received shocks showed increased fear and anxiety when walking and training. It was also observed that they were frightened in the training area, as well as, in the presence of the trainer.

All dogs are different and there were some dogs that showed a high tolerance to pain and were not affected by the shock collar.

 Conclusion

With this information in mind, you can make an informative choice if a dog shock collar will be good for you and your dog. If you use the shock settings, choose a setting that will not make your dog yelp or cry. Adjust to a setting so that you get your dog’s attention. The important thing is that you want a happy, well-adjusted dog, and that comes by giving your dog lots of praise and rewards during the training process.